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kushandwizdom:

Good Vibes HERE
04.24.14 ♥ 4725
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intercase:

Wavy Lines (by Aerial Photography)

04.24.14 ♥ 2417
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phylliscoppolino:

Bob in the April Sun - 2014 (by GOR44Photographic)

04.23.14 ♥ 7
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phylliscoppolino:

Nuthatch by lintonthelion on Flickr.

Spent an hour with the Nuttys. Very fleeting visits from both birds as normal until a bird of prey was heard overhead. All of the other birds around the area scattered but this Nuthatch froze in this position on the stump for over 2 minutes. It kept in the same pose and slowly turned its head almost as if to assess the situation and look out for danger.

04.23.14 ♥ 4
I knew who I was this morning, but I’ve changed a few times since then.

—  Lewis Carroll, Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland & Through the Looking-Glass  (via larmoyante)

04.23.14 ♥ 17964
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britishstarr:

fuck-benedict-cumberbatch:

thewhisperinglady:

flowerfistandbestialwail:


In a simple experiment, researchers at the University of Chicago sought to find out whether a rat would release a fellow rat from an unpleasantly restrictive cage if it could. The answer was yes.
The free rat, occasionally hearing distress calls from its compatriot, learned to open the cage and did so with greater efficiency over time. It would release the other animal even if there wasn’t the payoff of a reunion with it. Astonishingly, if given access to a small hoard of chocolate chips, the free rat would usually save at least one treat for the captive — which is a lot to expect of a rat.
The researchers came to the unavoidable conclusion that what they were seeing was empathy — and apparently selfless behavior driven by that mental state.
“A New Model of Empathy: The Rat” by David Brown, Washington Post


OH MY.

this just in: rats are more humane than humans

Yeah sure if I find a dude trapped in a cage in the middle of an alley I’m totally gonna approach him and let him out

britishstarr:

fuck-benedict-cumberbatch:

thewhisperinglady:

flowerfistandbestialwail:

In a simple experiment, researchers at the University of Chicago sought to find out whether a rat would release a fellow rat from an unpleasantly restrictive cage if it could. The answer was yes.

The free rat, occasionally hearing distress calls from its compatriot, learned to open the cage and did so with greater efficiency over time. It would release the other animal even if there wasn’t the payoff of a reunion with it. Astonishingly, if given access to a small hoard of chocolate chips, the free rat would usually save at least one treat for the captive — which is a lot to expect of a rat.

The researchers came to the unavoidable conclusion that what they were seeing was empathy — and apparently selfless behavior driven by that mental state.

“A New Model of Empathy: The Rat” by David Brown, Washington Post

OH MY.

this just in: rats are more humane than humans

Yeah sure if I find a dude trapped in a cage in the middle of an alley I’m totally gonna approach him and let him out

04.22.14 ♥ 87272

yuria1224:

Rooftoppers Secretly Climb 650-Meter-High Crane in Shanghai by Vitaly Raskalov and Vadim Makhorov | via

Russian photographers and adrenaline junkies Vitaly Raskalov and Vadim Makhorov, who are no strangers to traveling to the world’s towering skyscrapers and climbing them with absolutely no safety gear, have recently conquered the second tallest building in the world. The daredevil duo managed to gain access to China’s Shanghai Tower earlier this month, ascend the 650-meter-high structure, and take some incredible photos from their unique viewpoints.

As if rooftopping/skywalking and photographing from such great heights wasn’t enough, the two ventured off with the added pressure of sneaking into the construction site to scale the unfinished building while the city was busy celebrating the Chinese New Year. Raskalov says, “Aware of the strict Chinese law, we prepared carefully and picked an appropriate date, the Chinese New Year day. At that time the security was less watchful, workers were on vacations, and cranes did not work. We got to the crane at around midnight. It took us almost two hours to get on the 120th floor by foot. And also, we spend almost 18 hours on top of the building, sleeping and waiting for better weather.”

Watch their heart-pounding adventure in the video, below.

CJWHO:  facebook  |  instagram | twitter  |  pinterest  |  subscribe

No. Safety. Gear.

04.22.14 ♥ 10609